The venue

I.L. Caragiale National Theatre

The I.L. Caragiale National Theatre of Bucharest is a public cultural institution, of national importance, with judicial personality; it represents an institution of performances and repertoires. The Theatre aims to promote the cultural and the artistic values, both from Romania and from abroad, on national and international areas. With an existence of more than 160 years (the Great Theatre was founded in December 1852), the I.L. Caragiale National Theatre of Bucharest is truly a national cultural brand and it is one of the main promoters of the Romanian image abroad.

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ARCUB Gabroveni Cultural Centre

The Gabroveni Inn in the Old City Center of Bucharest was first mentioned in 1818 and in 1824 it was already listed among Bucharest’s most important inns, mainly due to its proximity to Lipscani commercial area. Along its years of existence, this building was transformed from being an important trading post to a ruin, and now, due to a complex restoration process, it attempts to combine elements of historic value whilst opening up the building to a post industrial reality where new ideas and creativity are fostered. Gabroveni Inn is now the new headquarters of ARCUB – The Cultural Centre of Bucharest and was conceived as a multifunctional cultural center, hosting a theater, visual art events, professional trainings and cultural and tourist information.

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Impact Hub Bucharest

Impact Hub Bucharest is the organization that supports entrepreneurial development initiatives with a positive impact in society, providing collaborative workspaces, software development and business incubation, conferences and events as well as financing options through crowdfunding. Present in Bucharest since 2012, the organization is part of the global network Impact Hub with subsidiaries in over 60 cities on 5 continents.

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Monteoru Villa

Alecu Niculescu built this house in 1874 and, in 1883, he sold it to another entrepreneur, Grigore Monteoru. A controversy arose between historians in Bucharest on the identity of the architect who designed the house. Initially it was Nicolae Cutarida, but between 1887 – 1889 Grigore Monteoru had asked for advice from architect Ion Mincu, the founder of the Neo-Romanian style. The style of the house is typical of the late 19th century; it is an eclectic style, with painted ceilings, hard wood stucco and an impressive staircase. The house was made according to all the contemporary architectural canons. As soon as the communist regime was instated in the ‘50s, Monteoru House became the headquarters of the Romanian Association for Relations with the USSR. The interior of the house however has remained unchanged; the famous lavishly decorated Mirror Hall has been preserved – the piano, the tile stoves made of Meissen porcelain, the Oriental artworks in Japanese drawing room and the paintings from the 2nd French Empire. Later on, through the efforts of Romanian writer and academician Mihail Sadoveanu, a supporter of the communist power and President of the Writers’ Union, the building became “The Writers’ House”, a title it has retained until 2013, when the house was returned to its family heirs Monteoru.

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General Radu Rosetti Villa – Triennale Headquarters

Ioana Ştirbey and Radu R. Rosetti have moved to Bucharest in 1909, when the architect Nicolae Ghika Budeşti began the construction of the house. The architecture, the style, the details and materials used are definitive for the philosophy of the architect Nicolae Ghika Budeşti, known due to numerous restorations of churches and buildings such as the Romanian Peasant Museum. The house is built in the neo-romanian style. Red brick masonry, the decorative elements of stone of the facades, the large windows on the ground floor, loggia on the second floor, fretted elements of cliffs and the tower that reminds of monasteries belfries give the building a distinctive and elegant noble appearance of a residence from the early twentieth century. During the years, most of the interior decorations were replaced after various renovations and changes in function.

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